Research shows notification systems like autobeacon substantially decease risk during the first years of driving. 

Title

A New GDL Framework: Evidence Base to Integrate Novice Driver Strategies

Publisher

Traffic Injury Research Foundation

Location

Ottawa : Ontario : Canada

Year

2014

Pages

52

Authors

D. Mayhew, A. Williams, C. Pashley

Sponsors NHTSA, National Safety Council, Allstate Foundation

 In 2014, the National Safety Council released the first of a three part report titled “A New GDL Framework: Evidence Base to Integrate Novice Driver Strategies.”  The goal of the three part report is to “better protect young drivers and reduce their elevated crash risk by integrating GDL programs with other best practice safety strategies for teens including driver education, licence testing and in-vehicle monitoring technologies.”  Phase 1 specifically reviewed “opportunities to integrate other proven and promising strategies to better protect young drivers throughout their first years of driving.” A central focus of this report is dedicated to tracking the development of in-vehicle monitoring for teen drivers, one of the ‘promising strategies’ to better protect young drivers.  

At the time of publishing, there was no product on the market that offered a comprehensive solution to in-vehicle monitoring.  Since that time, Autobeacon, LLC has developed a product that combines state of the art software applications with an integrated in-vehicle hardware component that addresses all the proposed functions of an in-vehicle monitoring system outlined in the report.  The following excerpts demonstrate the potential value of in-vehicle monitoring systems like Autobeacon;

 

“Available research has largely shown that in-vehicle monitoring technologies have the potential to reduce the crash risk, as well as engagement in risky behaviors by young and novice drivers. Results from several studies show that using in-vehicle monitoring technologies can significantly reduce the occurrence of risky driving among drivers.” (Page 30)

 

“As opposed to parental feedback, which may cause emotional stress and tension between parents and teen drivers, in-vehicle monitoring can provide an unbiased response to teens to let them know that they should adjust their driving.” (Page 31)

 

“[Benefits of in-vehicle monitoring] included being able to virtually accompany young drivers when parents were not present; moderating risky driving practices; helping young drivers to not be influenced by their peers when driving; providing the opportunity to open a dialogue between parents and teen drivers; and, that they could be used as a means for teenagers to prove to their parents that they are a safe driver.” (Page 33)

 

Title

An Exploration of Vehicle-Based Monitoring of Novice Teen Drivers: Final Report

Publisher

U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Location

Washington DC, USA

Year

2010

Pages

205

Authors

Neil Lerner, James Jenness, Jeremiah Singer, Sheila Klauer, Suzanne Lee, Max Donath, Michael Manser, & Nicholas Ward

 The purpose of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration project titled “An Exploration of Vehicle-Based Monitoring of Novice Teenage Drivers” was to systematically identify and structure the range of alternatives that might use vehicle-based sensing to mitigate the novice teen driver safety problem. The project sought to identify a range of promising approaches, ascertain user needs and preferences, indicate the research required to evaluate and compare alternatives, and provide recommendations for carrying this work forward. Focus groups of teen drivers and their parents were conducted to explore issues of motivation, preference, and usability of teen monitoring systems and concepts.

In the years since this report was first released, the proliferation of smartphones and developments in software have created new opportunities for in-vehicle monitoring that addresses many of the issues highlighted in this report.  The Autobeacon solution encompasses all the benefits of in-vehicle monitoring while answering the questions raised by parents and teens involved in focus groups and other research conducted for this report.

“Inexperienced teen drivers have exceptionally high rates of crash involvement. In 2006, 5,658 young drivers between the ages of 16 and 20 were killed in traffic crashes, and an additional 410,000 were injured.” (Page 1)

 

“About half of teen drivers report using a cell phone while driving (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and State Farm, 2007), and this distracting behavior inhibits driving performance and contributes to crashes.” (Page 10)

 

“Teens said that their parents or their friends’ parents worry about (and impose rules about) playing loud music, transporting friends, using a cell phone, and text messaging.” (Page 23)

 

“A few teens mentioned that their parents had expressed financial concerns about costs associated with the teen’s driving such as paying for traffic tickets.” (Page 23)

 

“Some parents specifically referred to their teens’ dangerous driving habits including speeding, maintaining short sight distances, driving with only one hand on the wheel, transporting too many passengers, and driving aggressively.” (Page 24)

 

“Several parents were interested in monitoring drinking and driving, maybe using a breathalyzer and alcohol interlock.” (Page 26)

 

“Finally, any way to limit the use of cell phones in vehicles was considered positive by many parents.” (Page 26)

 

Direct Focus Group Excerpts (Page 30-31)

“It’s just like a learner’s permit but with a camera instead of a parent.”

 (Male, Teen Group 2)

“If I were paying for my own insurance I wouldn’t mind obeying the rules making sure that the system didn’t go off to be able to get lower insurance rates.”                         

(Male, Teen Group 2)

“If everybody had it, it would be a lot more acceptable.”                                             

(Male, Parent Group 1)

“Some teens will rebel against it, but a lot of teens will understand that they don’t have the experience and this can be used to increase their safety.”                                     

(Male, Parent Group 1)

 

Title

“The little squealer” or “the virtual guardian angel”? Young drivers’ and their parents’ perspective on using a driver monitoring technology and its implications for parent-young driver communication

Publisher

Journal of Safety Research

Location

Tel Aviv, Israel

Year

2011, 2013

Authors

Guttman. & Gesser-Edelsburg A.

In-vehicle driving monitoring technologies have the potential to enable young drivers to learn from self-assessment. However, their use is largely dependent on parental involvement. A total of 79 interviews were conducted with young drivers and parents regarding this technology and its use. Most had the experience of having an in-vehicle data recorder installed in the vehicle driven by the young drivers. Parents and the young drivers expressed both appreciation as well as reservations about its potential as a means to enhance the driving safety of young drivers. Main concerns related to privacy, parent-young driver relationship, self-esteem and confidence, constructive use of the feedback data, and the limitations of the documentation that can be done by the technology.